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July 1, 2014

Best Free Sights in Tokyo

Tokyo, the most expensive city in the world? Yes, if you look at real estate prices, expat rents or the price of fruit in department stores (but who wants those overpriced melons? The Japanese themselves only use them as gifts in formal situations). But not at all, if you look at the entree fees of tourist destinations!

Surprisingly, Tokyo destinations are more often than not free or accessible for just a small price. Of course, I am not talking about the hotel bill, but in contrast to Kyoto and Nara with their increasingly pricey (read overpriced) temples, financially Tokyo is a breeze.

Here are the best free (and almost free) destinations in Tokyo: 

1. Start by looking at Tokyo from the air - and skip the Tokyo Skytree (which costs more than 2,000 yen), Roppongi Hills (1,500 yen) or the ancient Tokyo Tower (1,600). Come to the absolutely free observation platforms of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building, and at the same time, take the opportunity to see the interesting "Gotham City" architecture of top architect Tange Kenzo.

2. The 05:00 a.m. tuna auction at the Tsukiji Fish Market has long been a top priority for those interested in Japanese cuisine and those tormented by jet-lagged sleeplessness alike. But note that because of the huge stream of visitors Tsukiji has sharpened the rules: only 120 visitors a day, and registration necessary at the office at the entrance to the market - and no free roaming. But Tsukiji remains a must-see place. Note that the market is closed on Sundays and Public Holidays. See here for the full visiting conditions.

3. Visit the Imperial Palace, the green heart of Tokyo. Of course, you come here not for the palace, but for the remnants of the shogun's castle that occupies the same spot. You can freely see the East Gardens, which do contain a beautiful traditional garden, impressive walls and turrets, and a small free museum, the Sannomaru Shozokan. Note that they are closed on Mondays and Fridays. See here fore more details about opening times. Also see my post about the lost glory of the shoguns.

4. The most popular free temple is of course Sensoji in Asakusa, but there are alternatives less jammed with visitors. What about making a trip to the Itabashi ward and the free Jorenji Temple, which boasts a beautiful big Buddha, Tokyo's answer to Kamakura? The nearby Akatsuka Botanical Garden is also free, as is the Itabashi Historical Museum. See my previous post for visiting details and how to get there.

5. If you like mingei (folk art), the Japan Folk Crafts Museum will set you back 1,100 yen, but the excellent collection of the Hachiro Yuasa Memorial Museum located in the pleasantly wooded campus of the International Christian University (ICU) in Mitaka, is free. Dr Yuasa was the first President of the University and an avid collector of folk art from Japan and around the world, with a sharp eye. The museum also has a section with archaeological objects dating back to Jomon times, excavated from the campus. Note that the museum is closed on Sunday, Monday, Saturday and Public Holidays, as well as in the months of March, July and August. See here for visiting information.

6. Again a must for foodies: visit a "depachika," a department store basement dedicated to food in all its possible variations, Japanese and Western, from lunch boxes to single ingredients, from Japanese tea to sake, from cakes to wagashi, fish, meat and fruit, and this all presented in the most unbelievably beautiful way. If it makes your mouth water, note that sometimes free samples are given away. The best depachika is that of Isetan in Shinjuku, but the Daimaru next to Tokyo Station is also great.

7. Finally, a destination that is not free, but the best value for money in Tokyo: the huge standing exhibits of the Tokyo National Museum. For only 620 yen, you can easily spend a whole day in the four buildings that stand in its grounds, not only for the collection of traditional Japanese art, but also the Asian collection, the archaeological collection and the Horyuji treasures. Bring a bento or sandwiches to eat in the garden or the lounge of the Heiseikan (you can't go out and return).