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April 17, 2014

Haiku on Nara by Shiki: "Persimmon and Temple Bell"

In previous posts I have introduced five haiku written by Basho during his visits to Nara. The ancient capital was also favorite with other poets and here is an example of a haiku by Shiki, written during a visits to the venerable Horyuji Temple.

[Bell Tower of Horyuji]

as I eat a persimmon
the bell starts booming
Horyuji

kaki kueba | kane ga narunari | Horyuji

Masaoka Shiki (1867-1902) wrote this haiku in the autumn of 1895 and gave it the title 'Stopping at a Teashop at Horyuji Temple.' It is deservedly one of his most famous poems. Horyuji, of course, is one of Japan's oldest and grandest temples, a great treasury of 7th c. art. It possesses the oldest wooden buildings in the world.

Shiki's treatment of this solemn establishment is almost jocular and certainly very modern. Buddhism is ultimately concerned with causes and results, actions and their resulting karma. The ideal Buddhist situation is not to have any conscious actions and stop the Wheel of Karma that leads to countless rebirths and thus suffering. What then is the link between setting one's teeth in a persimmon and the resulting boom of Horyuji's temple bell?
The haiku stone stands at the edge of the pond in front of the Shoryoin Hall of Horyuji.From Kintetsu or JR Nara station 50-min by bus to Horyuji bus stop. Or a 15-min walk from JR Horyuji Station (which is 11 min by train from JR Nara Station).