Names in this site follow the Japanese custom of family name first.

March 30, 2014

Shodenji and its Garden, Kyoto

Shodenji is a small Zen temple, in a corner of northern Kyoto that has been blissfully forgotten by tourists. It is known for its dry garden with plantings of azalea bushes, from which in the distance the top of Mt Hiei is visible (like that other northern Kyoto garden, Entsuji). The garden was restored by famous garden architect Shigemori Mirei (1896-1975), the first restoration of an old temple garden he would undertake that in fact was almost a new creation.

Shodenji, Kyoto
[Shodenji]

Shodenji's garden originally dates from the 17th century. The temple today stands at the end of a residential district with still some fields and greenhouses left between the "my-homes," on a densely wooded hillside. The path to the temple, a long series of steps under high trees, seems to lead to another world, and indeed, as the temple sits on a flattened shelf, only the tops of trees and a distant mountain range are visible. Nothing discordant intrudes into this vision, and the only dissonant is aural: a machine gathering balls on a nearby golf course.

Shodenji's garden lies east of the Hojo (Superior's Quarters). On two sides it is enclosed by a tile-capped white clay wall; on the third side is a densely planted border. Original for this garden is the fact that groupings of stones usual in Zen gardens have been replaced by groupings of clipped azalea bushes. These azaleas are arranged in kare-sansui style: in groups of 7-5-3 (shichi-go-san), just as the rocks in Zen gardens. This grouping was considered as auspicious, and is - as usual - compared to "a lion family crossing a river."


Shodenji, Kyoto
[Garden of Shodenji - groupings of three and five azalea bushes]

The groupings increase in size from left to right, leading the eye to the right where there is a gate in the wall. The dark trees provide a nice contrast to the white walls, the white gravel and the plantings which in late April - early May color bright red. 

The upper outline of Mt Hiei is clearly visible above the wall and has been incorporated into the composition of this pristine, little garden. 

[The planting of seven azalea bushes and the gate in the garden of Shodenji]

The Rinzai Zen temple Shodenji was founded in 1268 by Togan Ean at Imadegawa, to "transmit the correct teaching" ("shoden") of the Chinese Song-dynasty Zen priest Gottan Funei. It was moved to the present location in 1282, on land donated by the head priest of the Kamigamo Shrine.

The area in which Shodenji is located is called Nishigamo and is a 20-30 min walk from either the Kamigamo Shrine to the east, or the Takagamine area to the west (with interesting temples as Koetsuji, Joshoji and Genkoan).
The bus stop nearest to Shodenji is Jinkoin-mae, one stop before the end of either line 9 or 37 to Nishigamo Shako. 
9:00-17:00. 400 yen.