Names in this site follow the Japanese custom of family name first.

March 13, 2014

Basho's Haiku on Nara (2): "Water Drawing"

Omizutori, 'water-drawing,' is a central rite of the Shunie (literally, 'rite observed in February') held at the Nigatsudo Hall of Todaiji Temple in Nara. The entire shunie lasts from March 1 to 14 (that is, in the modern calendar), during which period every evening an otaimatsu ceremony is held on the balcony of Nigatsudo: the waving of huge blazing torches from the hall's veranda, in fact whole trees set afire, sprinkling sparks over the crowd below (from 19:30, the biggest event is on March 12). The water drawing proper takes place in the night from March 12 to March 13 between around 01:30 and 02:30, when the priests draw water by torchlight from a well at the base of the hall. It is believed that water with special restorative powers is only available at that particular time. The water is offered to the image of the Eleven-Headed Kannon, the central Bodhisattva of the Nigatsudo Hall, who is a 'secret' statue. The rite symbolizes the arrival of spring and was first held in 752.

[Nigatsudo Hall of Todaiji, location of the Omizutori rite]

Otaimatsu is a most impressive ceremony and the monks who wave the torches come running down the verandah of the Nigatsudo on their wooden clogs, giving off a particular staccato rattle. This sound struck Basho and he aptly combines it with the icy cold which in March is still in the air in Nara, especially after dark.

Water Drawing!
the clogs of the monks
make an icy sound

mizutori ya | kori no so no | kutsu no oto


[Stone monuments at Nigatsudo, Todaiji]

When Basho visited Todaiji, the temple was still under repair after the destruction wrought by the civil wars of the sixteenth century. The Great Buddha statue was only finally completed in 1692, after the visit by Basho described above, and the statue sat for years in the open like the Great Buddha in Kamakura. The new Buddha Hall (which is the present one) was finally finished in 1708, but Basho did not live to see this. He grieved for the Buddha in its sad state, for at that time even the head had not been restored yet. Basho saw only the rump of the statue, slowly being covered by the first snow of the year, and he wrote:

first snow!
when will the temple building start
for the Great Buddha?

hatsu yuki ya | itsu Daibutsu no | hashira date

The haiku stone stands to the side of the steps leading up to the Nigatsudo Hall in Todaiji. No entrance fee.
30-min walk from Nara Kintetsu Station or JR Nara station.